Bio Engineering >> Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH

Micromanipulator for Life Science

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Detailed Specs

1. Cryo Liftout:
a cryo-compatible version of the microgrippers that can be cooled to LN2 temperatures.
The gripper is mounted to an MM3A-EM that has been enhanced for use with the cryo gripper using an insulated holder. The insulation allows the micromanipulator to remain at room temperature while the gripper is cooled by connecting it to the microscope’s cryo-system.
2. Patch clamp:
Cutting-edge patch clamp techniques require the electrode to be highly stable as well as drift-free for many hours. Conventional patch clamp devices do not meet the necessary requirements, but our compact manipulation devices that are less sensitive to vibrations will provide you with the tool you need to increase the success rate of a prolonged recording.
3. in vivo Patch clamp:
Beyond standard patch clamp experiments in vitro, there is a growing interest in performing recordings in live animals as they roam freely in controlled habitats. NM2104 is perfectly suited for this task. It’s small form factor and excellent stability as well as extreme precision make it an ideal tool for in vivo experiments.
4. Push-Pull Technique:
The push-pull technique, developed by Hess et. al., is used to apply an active compound to a well defined location (e.g. a single dendrite). This is achieved by using two micro pipettes and using one to apply the compound and the other to remove it from the bath.
5. Mechanical stimulation:
living lung cells respond to mechanical stimulation. Cells are grown on an elastic membrane, into which the arms of a microgripper can penetrate. Once in place, the microgripper can be used to apply various stretching amplitudes and frequencies to the cell and response in the form of released surfactants is detected using fluorescent dye.

Another biological application of mechanical stimulation is in the measurement of calcium increase in lung epithelial cells. A microgripper can be used to apply pressure on an elastic cell membrane and one can observe in the pictures and video available, how the calcium increases over the whole cell after the stimulation. The measurement was also made possible using calcium senstive fluorescent dye.

These techniques require a stable and accurate positioning system as well as a robust, programmable and highly precise microgripper.